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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
and scott brown, take a look at their sparring this year. >> i think what you're referring to is the fact that professor warren claimed she was a native american, a person of color. and as you can see, she's not. >> senator brown wants to raise an issue about my character, then i'll lay it out there. you know, when i was growing up, these are the stories i knew about my heritage. i believed my mother and my father and my aunts and my uncles and i never asked anybody for any documentation. >> well, i'll tell you, scott brown obviously lost that race. with john kerry going to state, scott walker's probably going to run in june, they could be serving together, what do you think about that? >> she knocked him out like manny pacquiao got knocked out, so forget that. she beat him down this last race, trust me. >> barack obama dealt the knockout blow. it wasn't this candidate, she was a very, very weak candidate by any standard. she's beloved by progressives but she won because barack obama was at the top of the ticket, let's get real. >> scott brown has a 58% favorability rating, it's likely he
to have diversity with women or black or red or yellow or brown or white if you have no relationships. and if i don't know the chairman of the republican national committee, i have no confidence that he has any relationship with chuck roast black guy, with billfold working white guy, with joe six pack hispanic. if i don't know him and i don't is say that to be self-serving. i just say that to point out how perplexing this when we think we can get people to vote for us if we don't know them. >> let's look at your bio. you were a member of congress from oklahoma for eight years. legislated chairman of the house republican conference, the fourth ranking leadership position and now, the chairman of a communications and public affairs company. you've had a long history in the republican party and as a manager and our peter hamby, he reported this about what the news of you rubbing for rnc chair was greeted with. he said he was met with a mix of quote skepticism, dispolice chief and even a hint of ridicule. do you believe it is racially driven? >> i don't. i think this. i think every single
is a brown girl whose parents are from africa but they are from egypt and so people tell her well, you know, you're not really black. you're african but not really african-american. both these girls are grappling with what it means to be brown skinned and who is really black in america today. >> this is a personal topic for you. it's part of your interest in all this. at what point did you realize, not to be indiscreet here, that your color changed the way people perceived you? >> early on. i grew up in an all white neighborhood in long island, so people made it very clear that our family didn't quite fit in. i have a similar background to nya's. my mom is black, my dad is white but my parents were very direct about our identity. for my five brothers and sisters and me.
everybody around me is white. meanwhile, her best friend is a brown girl whose parents are from africa but they are from egypt and so people tell her well, you know, you're not really black, you're african but not really african-american. both these girls are grappling with what it means to be brown skinned and who is really black in america today. >> this is a personal topic for you. it's part of your interest in all this. at what point did you realize, not to be indiscreet here, that your color changed the way people perceived you? >> early on. i grew up in an all white neighborhood in long island, so people made it very clear that our family didn't quite fit in. i have a similar background to nya's. my mom is black, my dad is white but my parents were very direct about our identity. we're black. my mother is cuban so we're latino. for us it's a very different situation than for a lot of young people today. growing number of young people are mixed race and they're trying to work out their identity and it's really tough for some of them. >> i know from the census department that the g
brown. a dui. and while the recent off-field violence was shocking, it's the violence on the field that is prasz a more pressing issue for the league. while there is criticism of the violent and reckless behavior away from the game, let's just be honest, america. we celebrate it on the field. that's what football is all about. as players have become bigger and faster than ever before, we have seen a rise in injuries, particularly concussions. these injuries, some of which have caused lives and the minds of players, literally, have prompted many to say the game has to change. it has to be a lot less dangerous for players. so far, those suggestions have been met with resistance that mo mostly come down to money. the nfl right now is enjoying its highest ratings ever. and they bring in $9
and has this latest development on adam lanza's interest in the military. mary ann gail brown is the writer of the story. thank you for taking the time. i know you spoke to one of nancy lanza's good friends. she told you adam was interested in joining the military. what was about it the military that made him interested? >> reporter: i think he had, what we're piecing together from ellen and other sources is that he had a fascination for a long ways back with things military-related. military equipment. he was a very, very bright young man. and when he first expressed that interest which was around the time he was ending his course work at western connecticut state university, initially his mother was very supportive of the idea and that's what several sources have told me. she was initially very supportive of it because it would have given him organization, structure, a career path even. and he was a very, very bright person. but as time wore on and she thought about it more and what she knew about her son, she realized this might not be the best path for him. >> why did she
ben from class. >> they're in the same -- >> they're in the same class. mrs. brown's class, i believe. but you know, we have other funerals to go to and it's a tough -- going to be a tough week. it's going to be a tough road to haul for the next couple weeks. our community's completely devastated. everybody walking around town is completely numb, bags under their eyes, not knowing what to do. we need national support and we don't want you guys to forget about us as you pull away out of our town. something has to be done and there are people standing up ready to do something. we just need to see action. >> one of the people who died was vicky soto. i know that your daughter, who is now 12, remembers vicky. vicky was a substitute teacher when your daughter was at sandy hook. what was it as a father that made her so memorable? >> my daughter said how nice she was. my son knows her from being in school there last year, how nice she was and how kind. she's a beautiful woman, in the prime of her life. the job that she did with the students is echoed throughout the community. just a memorabl
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)